Big dreams to change the world – happy International Youth Day!

AIDS2018 - Watipa 2Young people are the leaders of today – and of tomorrow. We know that at Watipa, and here is another example in the context of the global response to HIV.

On this International Youth Day, we are calling for meaningful, frequent, and wide engagement of adolescent girls and young women in the strategic development, planning, and delivery of programmes and services aimed at serving them… in lots of areas, including the response to HIV. Continue reading “Big dreams to change the world – happy International Youth Day!”

Meet a scholar: Aisha Bukenya, Uganda

fullsizeoutput_3866.jpeg“I hope that one day I’ll be able to give back to my community through provision of world class healthcare.”

Meet Aisha Bukenya, a 2016 Watipa scholar, studying a Bachelor’s of Pharmacy at Kampala International University Western Campus. She has recently completed her exams for the year and is attending ward rounds as part of her program. 

I am Aisha Bukenya, and I am pursuing a bachelors degree in pharmacy in my final semester of study. I chose this path of study because the health system in my country and in Africa as a whole has always broken my heart. I feel that there is a lot more that we can do. Continue reading “Meet a scholar: Aisha Bukenya, Uganda”

Nothing is impossible! Meet Aisha Nalukenge, Watipa scholar, Uganda

“Nothing is impossible is what I whisper to myself each day.”

Meet Aisha Nalukenge, a 2017 Watipa scholar, studying for Bachelors of Public Administration and Management (BPAM) in Mbale, Uganda. Aisha recently had the opportunity to participate in an entrepreneur training with Balloon Ventures.

My passion and desire to test several ideas each day amazes me. I feel like I have become more of an effectual thinker, and I now look at the world of business in a different positive way.  Continue reading “Nothing is impossible! Meet Aisha Nalukenge, Watipa scholar, Uganda”

Meet a scholar: Daniel Torach, Uganda

IMG_20160101_073654 “In my country you have to be a job creator and not a job seeker”

My name is Daniel Torach. I am a male Ugandan aged 22 years. I live in a small town called Kyebando, which is a suburb of Kampala. I come from a family of three children and I am the eldest. I am pursuing a Diploma in Electrical Engineering and Installation at an institution in Kampala called YMCA Comprehensive institute.

I have always had a dream of being an electrical engineer because I am so passionate when it comes to electricity. I finally got the chance to pursue studies in electricity thanks to the scholarship, as it gave me a start. Watipa kickstarted my lost hopes into a living testimony – my high hopes of being an electrical engineer started to become a reality. Continue reading “Meet a scholar: Daniel Torach, Uganda”

Meet a scholar: Kyendikuwa Francis, Uganda

“Being a Watipa scholar has helped me to extend my academic levels, I am persistent and personally determined to achieve my goals.”

Kyendikuwa is studying and working towards a future society that is job creating not job seeking. You can watch a short film he made for the Watipa film competition earlier this year on YouTube.

Continue reading “Meet a scholar: Kyendikuwa Francis, Uganda”

Meet a scholar: Mariam Nassaka, Uganda

“2017 has been my year of extraordinary things…now I can see and touch the things I used to watch in my dreams.”

Nassaka is studying so she can help her community overcome social problems and provide rights-based mentorship to other women and girls. You can watch a short film she made for the Watipa film competition on YouTube.

Continue reading “Meet a scholar: Mariam Nassaka, Uganda”

Meet a scholar: Aisha Bukenya, Uganda

“God bless Watipa for reaching out to us and making a difference in our lives, it has been a huge struggle on my side but I pulled myself through and thank Watipa for the moral and financial support”

Aisha Bukenya will use her education to give back to her community and be a “strong and influential woman.”

Continue reading “Meet a scholar: Aisha Bukenya, Uganda”

A different type of ball: Reducing teenage pregnancies through soccer

IMG_8212One of the best things about being a lady in Uganda is that you are the in charge of a home; as an adolescent you are trained to have a high sense of responsibility and critical decision making skills. A typical day is to wake up and prepare for school, and prepare the little ones (young brothers, sisters, cousins) as well. After school is a routine of house chores and home work.

Raising a lady in Africa also includes tackling gender biases that are seconded by the myths and misconceptions surrounding areas of sexual reproductive health. Take for instance that a girl cannot shake hands with other people during menstruation or that a girl cannot ride a bike or play soccer because it may affect her virginity.

Having spent time at three Grassroot Soccer centers over the last few weeks, my view has completely widened on how sport and gender can bring about gender equity and influence mindsets to reduce the transmission rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted illnesses as well as unintended pregnancies amongst adolescent girls and young women. Continue reading “A different type of ball: Reducing teenage pregnancies through soccer”